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Jewelry

Featuring unique hand made, fair trade and ethically traded jewelry from artisans in Nepal, Peru, Tibet, Inda and the USA. Designs crafted from Sterling Silver, alpaca silver, semi-precious stones as well as simple seeds and beads from our friends in the Amazon. Find your unique look in a bracelet, pendant, necklace, earring or ring. You can even target your search by region or theme.

 

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Items 1 to 10 of 11 total

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  1. Sacred Pottery Vessel

    A unique pottery vessel with short neck opening and round body.  Imprint of an ibis-like bird on one side and dragon-like reptile on the reverse.  This piece comes to us from the home of a private collector.  Belived to be pre colonial from Peru.  

    $300.00
  2. Peruvian Museum Replica Ceramic Sculpture - Moche - Warrior w/Jaguar

    Replica of Pre-Columbian, Moche stirrup spout vessel created in the likeness of a Mochica warrior in full armor, on one knee, holding a club. The warrior sports an elaborate headdress adorned with a protruding image of a jaguar head. The jaguar symbolized power and might throughout the Pre-Columbian world. Warriors, rulers, hunters, and shamans alike associated themselves with this king of beasts, the largest and most powerful feline in the New World. In addition, the principal Moche god wears a headdress adorned with a jaguar head and paws and important mortals such as this warrior donned similar headdresses. A nocturnal animal, the jaguar sleeps in caves and dark places and creeps quietly in the forest, evoking great mystery. Oddly enough, few Moche artists would have actually seen jaguars as they are not indigenous to the coast. Jaguars prefer moist forest conditions. However, scholars believe that some cubs were transported over the mountains for Moche rituals and it is also possible that some jaguars wandered down the coast. Crafted in the north of Peru.

    $85.00
  3. Peruvian Museum Replica Ceramic Sculpture - Moche - Warrior w/Club

    Replica of Pre-Columbian, Moche stirrup vessel created in the likeness of a Mochica warrior in full armor, kneeling on one leg, holding a maize club. The warrior dons impressive regalia, an elaborate headdress adorned with an image of a jaguar head in relief. The jaguar symbolized power and might throughout the Pre-Columbian world. Warriors, rulers, hunters, and shamans alike associated themselves with this king of beasts, the largest and most powerful feline in the New World. In addition, the principal Moche god wears a headdress adorned with a jaguar head and paws and important mortals such as the warrior depicted in this example donned similar headdresses. A nocturnal animal, the jaguar sleeps in caves and dark places and creeps quietly in the forest, evoking great mystery. Oddly enough, few Moche artists would have actually seen jaguars as they are not indigenous to the coast. Jaguars prefer moist forest conditions. However, scholars believe that some cubs were transported over the mountains for Moche rituals and it is also possible that some jaguars wandered down the coast. Crafted in the north of Peru.

    $85.00
  4. Peruvian Museum Replica Ceramic Sculpture - Moche - Aiyapec God

    This replica of an ancient Peruvian vessel, likely Aiyapec, the Cut-throat God, is hand formed from clay and fired to create a delicate ceramic vessel. Crafted in the north Trujillo district, El Porvenir, Peru, it is believed to copy those of the Moche culture, a relatively short-lived civilization which flourished on the northern coast of Peru from about 1200 to its absorption by the Inca empire around 1460. Their pottery sculptures often took the shape of a creature or a human figure sitting or standing. Aiyapec was known for sacrificing prisoners and delivering a person to the gods to bring on rains. Handmade in Peru.

    $85.00
  5. Peruvian Museum Replica Ceramic Sculpture - Chimu - Monkey

    This replica of an ancient Peruvian vessel, likely a howler monkey, is hand formed from clay and fired to create a delicate ceramic vessel. Crafted in the north Trujillo district, El Porvenir, Peru, it is believed to copy those of the Chimu culture, a relatively short-lived civilization which flourished on the northern coast of Peru from about 1200 to its absorption by the Inca empire around 1460. Their pottery sculptures often took the shape of a creature or a human figure sitting or standing. Handmade in Peru.

    $85.00
  6. Moche Warrior Ceramic Sculpture

    A brave, fearless Moche warrior prepares for combat holding a square shield in one hand, and a porra or spear in the other. His headgear symbolizes his high caste and respectable status. Handmade with great artistry of red clay and fired to create a delicate ceramic vessel in the shape of a horn. Replica of an original ancient design. Measures 6.5 x 5 x 2 inches. Handmade in Peru.

    $85.00
  7. Huaco Silbador-Peruvian Whistling Vessel - Warrior

    This single chambered hollow clay replica of a pre-Colombian Peruvian whistling vessel reflects the form of a man, likely a warrior, with a headdress of corn cobs standing on a grouping of corn cobs. Corn was one of the most commonly depicted food stuff, with some clay pieces being formed in molds created from actual ears of corn to ensure accurate impressions. Crafted in the north Trujillo district El Porvenir, Peru, it is a replica of an original ancient design. Exquisitely made, it is hard to distinguish from the original. The whistle on this piece is functional with a sweet high sound. Made in Peru.

    $100.00
  8. Huaco Silbador-Peruvian Whistling Vessel - Cross-Legged Warrior

    This dual chambered hollow clay replica of a pre-Colombian Peruvian whistling vessel is fashioned in the form of a human, in a seated, cross-legged position. The arms are raised and the hands touch both sides of the head as if covering the ears or adjusting a headpiece. Crafted in the north Trujillo district El Porvenir, Peru, it is a replica of an original ancient design. Exquisitely made. The whistle on this piece is functional with a soft sound. Not activated by water, must be blown. Made in Peru.

    $100.00
  9. Huaco Silbador-Peruvian Whistling Vessel - Corn Cob Warrior

    This single chambered hollow clay replica of a pre-Colombian Peruvian whistling vessel is fashioned in the form of a man, likely a warrior, holding corncobs in a grouping of corn cobs. Corn was one of the most commonly depicted food stuff, with some clay pieces being formed in molds created from actual ears of corn to ensure accurate impressions. Crafted in the north Trujillo district El Porvenir, Peru, it is a replica of an original ancient design. Exquisitely made. The whistle on this piece is functional with a soft sound. Made in Peru.

    $100.00
  10. Huaco Silbador-Peruvian Whistling Vessel - Animals

    This single chambered hollow clay replica of a pre-Colombian Peruvian whistling vessel is fashioned in the form of a human, possibly a warrior with an elaborate headdress. Standing on each shoulder are tall earred animals. Around the base is intricate decorative detail. The handle holds another small human head. Crafted in the north Trujillo district El Porvenir, Peru, it is a replica of an original ancient design. Exquisitely made. The whistle on this piece is functional with a soft sound. Made in Peru.

    $100.00
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Items 1 to 10 of 11 total

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