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Grateful for This Life by Rowan Farrell

Grateful for This Life by Rowan Farrell

$150.00

(In stock)

Grateful for This Life by Rowan Farrell « »

Grateful for This Life by Rowan Farrell

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Gracias a la Vida (Grateful for this Life) -  This cuento milagro (miracle story) is a resurrection legend about the underworld connection to Wild Woman. It promises that if we sing the song of gratitude, we can call up the psychic remains of the Wild Woman soul and sing her into a vital shape again. - Clarissa Pinkola Estes, Women Who Run with the Wolves

Grateful for This LIfe by Rowan Farrell is a museum quality print on paper from her original painting of the same name.  It is one of twelve original paintings in her collection Deeper Than Dreams, Archetypal Visions Series.  Comes in three sizes:  30 x 30, 15 x 15 and 12 x 12 inches.  Partial proceeds from the sale of this print are donated to The Heart of the Healer Foundation dedicated to preserving indigenous wisdom and restoring our earth.  

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$150.00

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Deeper than Dreams

"invoking ancient roots of ceremony and healing"

These works began just following the homebirth of my second child.
They reflect an urgent preoccupation with our prehistorical lineage of healing, birth practices, shamanism; also known as the Wise Woman Tradition.

The pathway through this historical context is neither straightforward nor simple. As Barbara Medlock, author of The Woman in the Shamans Body, has stated, “… that is as it should be, for shamanic experience itself is neither straightforward nor simple. It is complex, mystical, and awe-inspiring, as befits the integration of the physical and spiritual worlds—two diverse and powerful realms where the shaman practices her calling.

The oldest known skeletal remains of a shaman belong to a woman, but she is also the earliest known artisan who worked in clay and then hardened it with fire. She wasn’t making early household utensils; no, she seems to have been making talismans or figurines of some sort, perhaps for use in her rituals and spiritual healing.

How has it happened that we’ve lost sight of this ancient woman shaman and what she represents? That women’s bodies and minds are particularly suited to tap into the power of the transcendental has been ignored. The roles that women have played in healing and prophecy throughout human history have been denigrated. All too often women who enter medicine or the ministry still believe they’re stepping into a strictly men’s field; in fact, these are historically women’s fields that men have since entered.

Women have been characterized as mere artisans or craftspeople—weavers and potters—instead of recognized for the creative, life- giving, cosmos-shaping powers these arts represent. Why? It’s time to take another look at the evidence of millennia and of cultures around the globe. It’s time to reclaim the woman in the shaman’s body.”


Determined to paint with a newborn suckling in my arms, my practice is to embrace and integrate the demands of tending and nurturing rather than resist the flow while allowing a blessing of gratitude to meet all the women who have come and birthed before me. The result is often a fusion of my daughter’s brilliant drawings and a playful exploration of a deep and otherwise endangered way of being in the world.