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Shipibo-Pottery

Shipibo-Conibo, Amazon, Peru

Approximately 30 years ago, as many as 150 different ethno-linguistic groups could be identified living in the rainforest jungles of Peru. Today less than 30 ethnic groups remain. Among these survivors is one of the oldest ancestral groups, the Shipibo people, who now are at risk of becoming extinct. It is estimated that perhaps only 35,000 Shipibo remain living spread out in as many as 300 different family villages. For centuries, these people have survived primarily through their relationship with the jungle and through activities such as hunting, fishing and traditional agriculture.

Shipibo artisans are well known for their colorful designs on pottery and textiles. Inspired by Ayahuasca-induced visions, creation stories and mythic folklore, these refined geometrical designs are sophisticated interpretations of cosmic realities.


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  1. Shipibo_Amazon_Jungle_Quempo_Bowl_-_5_In.

    Shipibo Amazon Jungle Quempo Bowl - 5 In.

    For the Shipibo, pottery is distinctly female work.  Quempo is how the Shipibo refer to this type of flaring bowl, also known in the jungle as mocahua.  It is used to used to drink masato, a thick, yucca-based drink and for other fluids and therefore has external water-related motifs. The thin walls of this bowl are elegantly constructed so that the rim is narrower than the body.  A face is painted over slight protrusions of pottery for the eyes, nose, chin and ears.  Beautifully painted with fine Shipibo artistic patterns, typical of their work. Slight variations occur due to the handmade nature of this item.  Made by Shipibo women of Peru.

    Learn More
    $35.00

  2. Shipibo_Amazon_Jungle_Quempo_Bowl_-_4_In.

    Shipibo Amazon Jungle Quempo Bowl - 4 In.

    For the Shipibo, pottery is distinctly female work.  Quempo is how the Shipibo refer to this type of flaring bowl, also known in the jungle as mocahua.  It is used to used to drink masato, a thick, yucca-based drink and for other fluids and therefore has external water-related motifs. The thin walls of this bowl are elegantly constructed so that the rim is narrower than the body.  A face is painted over slight protrusions of pottery for the eyes, nose, chin and ears.  Beautifully painted with fine Shipibo artistic patterns, typical of their work. Slight variations occur due to the handmade nature of this item.  Made by Shipibo women of Peru. Learn More
    $32.00

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